Study abroad in Heidelberg, Germany next Spring

JANUARY 4 – MAY 12 (apply by October 1)

The spring semester is a great time to study in Heidelberg. Though temperatures might be cold when students arrive in January, by March the sun will be shining and students will be able to enjoy many outdoor recreation activities that Heidelberg and the surrounding areas have to offer.

At the beginning of the semester, for example, students may want to take a trip to one of the many ski regions nearby. As the temperatures slowly rise, Heidelberg’s great outdoors come back to life.

Also during the spring Heidelberg hosts one of the biggest music festivals in Germany, the Heidelberger Frühling. Each year over the four days of the festival, nearly 30,000 visitors come to Heidelberg to enjoy one of the concerts or just to experience the lively atmosphere that the festival brings to the city.

Program Dates

Application deadlineOctober 1, 2017
Arrival in Heidelberg* (plan to arrive by 1pm)Thurs. January 4, 2018
Mandatory Orientation**Thurs. January 4 – Sun. 7, 2018
Classes StartMon. January 8, 2018
Add/Drop deadline for ESC coursesSun. January 14, 2018
Add/Drop deadline for SRH coursesSunday of the week that classes begin
“Castle Talks” International Symposium in StrasbourgMon. March 19 – Tues. March 20, 2018
Weekend in BerlinFri. March 23 – Sun. March 25, 2018
Spring BreakFri. March 30 – Fri. April 6, 2018
Last day of classes including finalsFri. May 11, 2018
Check out of housingSat. May 12, 2018

Program Fee: $12,990

Go to “Program Fees” for further information!

What’s included?

  • Tuition for 5 courses
  • Accommodation at the European Study Center, a historical villa in Heidelberg or in shared apartments nearby
  • Transportation from/to Frankfurt International Airport (FRA)
  • Orientation program (tour of the ESC facilities, tour of the neighborhood, tour of downtown Heidelberg)
  • Welcome dinner
  • 3-day weekend excursion to Berlin including round-trip train ticket, accommodation
    and guided tours
  • Numerous cultural activities and day excursions throughout the program, for example:
    • Frankfurt (Stock Exchange)
    • Strasbourg, France (European Institutions)
    • Multiple excursions in and around Heidelberg to visit castles, historical cities, museums, etc.
  • “Castle Talks” International Symposium in Strasbourg
  • Some additional group meals during cultural activities
  • On-site team available throughout the entire program
  • Cell phone use (optional, calling time not included)
  • Necessary transportation for cultural activities in the program
  • Farewell dinner

Payment Schedules »

Course Overview

This course allows students to make the most of their cultural excursions both academically and personally. Students will gain academic credit for the field trips and professional visits which are built in to the program by writing up personal reflections and connections to other areas of study in the form of short papers, journals and blog entries. This course may be cross-referenced with Topics in Comparative Politics and Topics in International Relations. It is an advanced study in political science focusing on comparative politics or international relations. The course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.
course description coming soon
The purpose of this course is to give the student knowledge of art from specific cultures and periods of time from the Renaissance through the Twentieth Century. The student will be able to identify individual pieces of art, analyze those works both verbally and in writing, present logical deductions about the work based on his/her own observations and knowledge obtained from material presented in the text and in lectures, and finally to compare and contrast art from different time periods to understand how one influenced the other. Among the skills attained will be the ability to consciously analyze the development of an individual artist’s work within the context of his or her time and his society, as well as knowledge of the development of art that takes into account its cultural, social, economic and historical realities. Prerequisite: ARTH 2361
International Marketing examines the overall changes marketers must consider when planning and implementing marketing activities outside the home market. Students will develop basic principles of effective analysis and decision making in regards to adaptation or standardization of marketing practices such as segmentation, targeting, positioning and the development of a marketing mix to fit the needs of international or global markets.
This course includes close reading and discussion of texts of all kinds from a wide range of periods and societies to reveal the diversity of literature as a means of cultural statement. It is designed as a directed exploration of worldwide literary genres and techniques of close study that emphasizes the development of critical reading skills and methodologies of literary analysis, i.e. of what can be said well about a work of art. Close readings of the assigned literary works will help develop our appreciation of literature as finely crafted, multidimensional art. In addition, such readings allow us to examine the connections between literature and culture. In examining these connections, we explore the role of art and the artist in social justice, an important aspect of study at our university.
This intensive course covers all aspects of successful language learning: developing your speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. Project work and extra-curricular activities further enhance autonomous learning behavior and German language use outside the classroom. The course provides students with a basic knowledge of German covering vocabulary and grammar structures necessary for conducting simple everyday conversation. Instruction is based on the stages of the CEFR (A1-C1).
This course is designed to serve as an introduction to the study of politics in Europe. Students will develop a core body of knowledge concerning the political systems in Europe. Students will also be introduced to the political systems of selected nation-states in Europe.
This course studies the political, economic, and religious expansion of Europe from the 15th century to World War I; the rise of the modern state system and the nature of modern society since the French Revolution; the ideological roots and nature of totalitarianism as well as the role played by Europe in world affairs from the Cold War to the 1990s; the collapse of the Soviet Union and of Yugoslavia; and the ongoing efforts to create a united European Continent.
Living in another country, even for a short period, allows one to develop a sense of cultural empathy and understanding that cannot be replicated within your home country. This course helps students not only think more deeply about their own cultural identity, but helps them build a framework for understanding one of the most pressing issues of our time, how to manage the greater than 50 million refugees across the world. We will examine the issue from an academic and personal perspective interacting with the local community in Heidelberg and beyond as we review myriad of sources from poems, to news articles, to journal articles, to works of art.

The seminar format takes advantage of a variety of teaching and learning methods to develop not just content knowledge, but builds skills in critical thinking, creativity, writing, and independence. The course is divided into three parts which broadly meet three liberal learning objectives as well as civic engagement and information literacy. Students will keep a digital journal for the course and will share in the maintenance a blog for the course. More traditional classroom learning will be supported with exploration of the city and the surrounding area as well as visits to companies, museums, and non-profit organizations.

This course is an introduction to major philosophical traditions around the world, which may include Japanese, Chinese, South Asian, Arabic, Persian, American Indian, Latin American, African, and Western philosophy. Students in this course will be reading materials from outside the traditional canon of Western philosophy. Efforts will be focused on questions of knowledge and reality, value and society, God and cosmos. Students from all disciplines will gain important skills in reading the values and concepts developed in various human cultures. Material will be drawn from Asian, African, Latin American, and other traditions. Students will study ideas from around the world that have entered into the stream of intellectual history; they may also study ideas from less conspicuous sources - in particular, from the many unexamined traditions of indigenous peoples. As a result, students will advance in their general ability to express ideas and analyze arguments.
This course studies individual behavior and attitudes as influenced by other individuals and groups, and considers issues such as conformity, attitude formation and change, attraction, aggression, prejudice, and altruism.
Learn the concepts and terminology utilized in the study of communication, especially intercultural communication. Understand the importance of culture in the communication process, and how culture affects both the verbal and nonverbal forms of communication. Make students sensitive to the difficulties involved in all forms of intercultural communication, including interclass and interethnic communication. May be taken as a Cultural Studies elective.
Download course syllabi

COURSES INSTRUCTED AT THE SRH UNIVERSITY HEIDELBERG
Only one course can be taken during each 5-week block.

January 8 – February 9, 2018

Theories and concepts used in managing business personnel. Topics include: personnel planning, recruiting, selection, compensation, separation and retirement. Prerequisites: BMGT 3340 and Junior standing.
Upon successful completion of the course students should have a basic understanding of the structure and functioning of the Market, and understand factors affecting both production companies, of investment and consumer goods, as well as commercial enterprises. The student will understand the underlying distribution systems and the central instruments of sales management and can identify the corresponding structures in practice.
February 12 – March 16, 2018
Theories and concepts used in managing business personnel. Topics include: personnel planning, recruiting, selection, compensation, separation and retirement. Prerequisites: BMGT 3340 and Junior standing.
Upon successful completion of the course students should have a basic understanding of the structure and functioning of the Market, and understand factors affecting both production companies, of investment and consumer goods, as well as commercial enterprises. The student will understand the underlying distribution systems and the central instruments of sales management and can identify the corresponding structures in practice.
After having completed this course successfully, students will have grasped the fundamental structure of cost and activity accounting. Thus, they should be able to understand the relevant make-up and procedures in simple cost calculation systems used by companies and organizations and interpret reports generated from these systems. In addition they should be capable of carrying out some simple tasks in real systems after having been given some instruction.
April 9 – May 11, 2018
This course provides knowledge and insights on how firms design and deliver products and services to their customers, how manufacturing and service firms associate themselves with suppliers and distributors in efficient supply-chains, and how managers use optimization techniques to improve quality and increase productivity. This operations perspective is essential to understand how firms compete in the marketplace, add value for their customers, and pursue profitability.
After participation in this course, students will be prepared to solve fundamental problems in investment and financing. Students learn the meaning of cash flow in an enterprise's functions.
After having completed this course successfully, students will have grasped the fundamental structure of cost and activity accounting. Thus, they should be able to understand the relevant make-up and procedures in simple cost calculation systems used by companies and organizations and interpret reports generated from these systems. In addition they should be capable of carrying out some simple tasks in real systems after having been given some instruction.
Download course syllabi

GERMAN LANGUAGE COURSES
INSTRUCTED AT THE ih Heidelberg / Collegium Palatinum

Students may take Intensive German Language Courses at all levels at the ih Heidelberg / Collegium
Palatinum. Intensive Courses are held for 20 or 25 hours per week, and students are advised to get pre-approval from their home universities for evaluation of transfer credit.